Jurong from Joanne

Introduction of Jurong
Jurong is probably derived from the Malay word jerung, which means a “shark”. Jurong Road was cut around 1852-1853, during the time of John Thomson’s tenure as Chief Surveyor. Many roads within the Jurong Industrial Estate named in the late 1960s and early 1970s drew inspiration from the nature of industrial activities in the estate and related aspects of industrialisation.
For the local Chinese population, Jurong was formerly called peng kang, a reference to a gambier plantation located in the area. After 1906, rubber plantations dominated the area — Bulim Estate, Lokyang Estate, Chong Keng Estate, Seng Toh Estate and Yunnan Estate, giving rise to many of the local names for areas in Jurong. Jurong was also once called “Goh’s Folly”, as some Singaporeans doubted the success of Dr Goh Keng Swee’s plan to develop the area.
[edit]Accessiblity
[edit]Private
Jurong is well connected to the rest of Singapore by road, with Kranji Expressway linking them to the northern part of Singapore, Pan Island Expressway linking them to the Eastern part of Singapore and the Ayer Rajah Expressway linking them to the south-eastern part of Singapore. Clementi Avenue 6 and Jurong Town Hall Road complement the 3 expressways, topping off the well-built road connection from Jurong to all parts of the island.
[edit]Public
[edit]Mass Rapid Transit
The town is well-connected to the Mass Rapid Transit system with Bukit Batok, Jurong East, Chinese Garden, Lakeside, Boon Lay, Pioneer and Joo Koon stations. By 2016, Tuas station will open at the Gul industrial district of Jurong.
[edit]Bus
The town is well-served by public bus services originating from 2 interchanges and 1 bus depot, namely the Jurong East and Boon Lay bus interchanges and Soon Lee Bus Depot.

Introduction of Jurong
Jurong is probably derived from the Malay word jerung, which means a “shark”. Jurong Road was cut around 1852-1853, during the time of John Thomson’s tenure as Chief Surveyor. Many roads within the Jurong Industrial Estate named in the late 1960s and early 1970s drew inspiration from the nature of industrial activities in the estate and related aspects of industrialisation.For the local Chinese population, Jurong was formerly called peng kang, a reference to a gambier plantation located in the area. After 1906, rubber plantations dominated the area — Bulim Estate, Lokyang Estate, Chong Keng Estate, Seng Toh Estate and Yunnan Estate, giving rise to many of the local names for areas in Jurong. Jurong was also once called “Goh’s Folly”, as some Singaporeans doubted the success of Dr Goh Keng Swee’s plan to develop the area.[edit]Accessiblity
[edit]PrivateJurong is well connected to the rest of Singapore by road, with Kranji Expressway linking them to the northern part of Singapore, Pan Island Expressway linking them to the Eastern part of Singapore and the Ayer Rajah Expressway linking them to the south-eastern part of Singapore. Clementi Avenue 6 and Jurong Town Hall Road complement the 3 expressways, topping off the well-built road connection from Jurong to all parts of the island.[edit]Public[edit]Mass Rapid TransitThe town is well-connected to the Mass Rapid Transit system with Bukit Batok, Jurong East, Chinese Garden, Lakeside, Boon Lay, Pioneer and Joo Koon stations. By 2016, Tuas station will open at the Gul industrial district of Jurong.[edit]BusThe town is well-served by public bus services originating from 2 interchanges and 1 bus depot, namely the Jurong East and Boon Lay bus interchanges and Soon Lee Bus Depot.

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